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Community Profile /

Workforce

Communities in Northeast British Columbia have well diversified economies boasting the province’s highest full-time employment share at 83% (2015). Major industry sectors are:

  • Mining, oil & gas extraction
  • Construction
  • Wood product manufacturing
  • Wholesale trade
  • Retail Trade
  • Transportation & Warehousing
  • Professional, Scientific & Technical Services
  • Education
  • Health Care & Social Assistance
  • Accommodation & Food Services
  • Public Administration

Agriculture is an important part of the economy of Dawson Creek supplying local, regional and global markets. Forestry and logging services supply timber for Louisiana-Pacific’s OSB plants in Dawson Creek and Peace Valley OSB in Fort St John, Slocan Pulp in Taylor, Canfor in Fort St John, and Chetwynd Pulp in Chetwynd.

Construction is a seasonal industry for some companies. Firms involved in paving projects tend to work only in the summer months. Conversely, firms involved in building roads into oilfield leases work mainly during the winter months.

Because Dawson Creek is centrally located and is serviced by many highways, workers who live in Dawson Creek are able to commute to jobs in other municipalities such as Tumbler Ridge, Chetwynd, Taylor and Fort St John. Also, the rural population is able to easily travel into Dawson Creek for work.

The Five Industries Forecast To Expand The Fastest In The Region Are:

The North region includes Cariboo, Northeast as well as North Coast and Nechako.

INDUSTRY ANNUAL AVERAGE EMPLOYMENT DEMAND GROWTH
Accommodation services 2.1%
Support activities for mining and oil and gas extraction 1.4%
Other professional, scientific and technical services 1.4%
Oil and gas extraction 1.4%
Architectural, engineering and related services 1.3%

Source: WorkBC
www.workbc.ca/getmedia/00de3b15-0551-4f70-9e6b-23ffb6c9cb86/LabourMarketOutlook.aspx

Employment Projections

BC Labour Market Outlook 2015-2025: North Region

Compared to B.C. overall, labour force participation is higher, especially in Northeast.

Occupation Expansion Replacement Job Openings
O: Usually requiring a combination of education and experience  
Retail and wholesale trade managers  0 1,740  1,730 
Managers in agriculture -10  710  700 
Construction managers 100  380  480 
Restaurant and food service managers 90  370  460 
Managers in natural resources production and fishing 30  260  290 
A: Usually requiring a Bachelor’s, Graduate or First Professional Degree
Elementary school and kindergarten teachers 150 770 920
Secondary school teachers 70 510 570
College and other vocational instructors 90 410 500
Financial auditors and accountants 60 250 310
Forestry professionals -40 340 310
B: Usually requiring diploma, certificate or apprenticeship training
Administrative officers 170 1,130 1,290
Accounting technicians and bookkeepers 290 1,010 1,290
Social and community service workers 380 870 1,250
Administrative assistants 170 850 1,020
Carpenters 240 700 940
C: Usually requiring secondary school and/or occupation-specific training
Transport truck drivers 100 2,360 2,460
Retail salespersons 0 1,420 1,410
Heavy equipment operators (except crane) 140 880 1,010
Receptionists 280 370 650
Elementary and secondary school teacher assistants 70 570 640
D: Usually requiring on-the-job training
Janitors, caretakers and building superintendents  210 1,030  1,230 
Light duty cleaners 250  510  760 
Food counter attendants, kitchen helpers and related support occupations 280  420  700 
Construction trades helpers and labourers 180  520  700 
Cashiers 60  430  490 

Source: WorkBC

www.workbc.ca/Statistics/Labour-Market/Forecasting-the-Labour-Market.aspx

Average / Median Income

Tax Year Average ($) Median ($)
2003 32,045 21,000
2004 33,119 22,300
2005 35,053 24,700
2006 40,140 28,900
2007 41,964 32,330
2008 43,494 34,750
2009 42,660 34,600
2010   36,150
2011   37,020

Source: BC Stats and Statistics Canada (most current data available from 2011 Census)

Occupation

Total – Occupation – National Occupational Classification for Statistics 12,285
Retail salespersons and sales clerks 675
Truck drivers 435
Cashiers 430
Retail trade managers 370
Food counter attendants, kitchen helpers and related occupations 270 
Community and social service workers 240 
Administrative officers 220 
Cooks  205 
Heavy equipment operators (except crane) 200 
Registered nurses 200

Source: Statistics Canada 2011 Census

Unemployment Rate Comparison

Unadjusted for seasonality, 3 month moving average ending in each month:

*Unemployment rate lower than can be reported due to issues of anonymity.